Accidentally Cooking

Documenting my mistakes in the garden, kitchen and pantry

Apple Wine

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One of my favorite parts of autumn is the fresh apple cider. We’ve been lucky enough to find a local brand of it which we like very much: sweet and mild with just a little tartness and no bitterness. It tastes great but is also has another awesome feature: it contains no preservatives.

I’m not the kind of person who dislikes chemicals and preservatives on principle. In a lot of cases, preservatives are extremely important, helping to keep food items that are otherwise perishable from spoiling. But with apple cider, one of the best things about it is that it ferments. I like to leave apple cider in the fridge for a week or more, until it just starts getting some sparkle and tang to it. I also like hard cider and apple wine. I picked up a gallon of cider for fermenting (and a second gallon, just for drinking. And some apple cider donuts, just because) and decided to put together a batch.

When I see recipes for hard apple cider on the internet, I frequently see people adding in apple juice concentrate to the mix. The theory, I think, is that the concentrate is cheap, it adds sugar, and it increases the apple flavor. I already have a product like that in my fridge from last year: boiled apple cider syrup. Since the apple cider we use has very little tartness and has a mild flavor, I decided to add some of that boiled syrup to the mix as well.

DSC_3910

Apple Wine

I’m going to leave off units of measure for this recipe, because it’s easy to scale up or down. The batch I made was 1 gallon, but all the same things apply for a 3 or 5 gallon batch as well. Since I finally own a hydrometer, I can give specific gravity readings.

  • Apple Cider [1]
  • Boiled Apple Cider Syrup [2]
  • Brown Sugar
  • Granulated Sugar
  • Yeast [3]
  • Yeast Nutrient

Start the yeast ahead of time in a small amount of cider, warmed to room temperature. Allow the yeast to hydrate and build up a bit of foam so you know it’s active.

Add the bulk of the apple cider to a bucket. Mix in the syrup and take a gravity reading with your hydrometer. Add sugar (I did half-and-half with the brown and the white) to bring the specific gravity up to 1.100. Transfer to your fermenter. Add the yeast and yeast nutrient and swirl well to mix.

When the fermentation slows down, rack to secondary and wait. I’ll post an update when we get that far. For now, as you can see, we’re still bubbling away.

DSC_3911

Notes

  1. Use any kind of apple cider or juice that you like drinking EXCEPT it may not contain preservatives. Preservatives are chemicals that kill or control yeast (among other microbial baddies), which is exactly the opposite of what you want. There are ways to use cider which contains Potassium Sorbate, if that’s the only preservative it contains.
  2. I boiled down 1 gallon of cider to about a pint or more of syrup. From that, I used about a cup or less in this recipe for 1 gallon of cider. I probably could have added more. Keep in mind that the boiled syrup, because of the heat of making it, is going to have a different flavor profile from fresh cider. So it will add more flavor, but slightly different flavor. It’s also going to add more acid, which could be problematic if your cider is already tart. I thought about adding this to the secondary as well, but decided to try it in primary instead.
  3. I used Red Star Cotes des Blancs. This was recommended to me as a yeast which is good for fruit wines and will finish sweet. I had originally bought this for a peach wine that I thought had stuck. I also picked up my hydrometer at the same time and when I tested the peach wine I saw that it indeed had fermented out. So, I kept this packet of yeast to use for cider.
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Author: Andrew Whitworth

I'm a software engineer from Philadelphia PA. Sometimes I like to go out to my garden, or step into my kitchen and make a really big mess of things.

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